Coach Connection Newsletter #52 - 12/28/18

Coach Connection Newsletter #52 - 12/28/18

 | Wednesday, January 2, 2019

REGIONAL COACHING CLINICS 2019

Registration is live and here is the link to the page:

Charleston, SC: Feb. 8-10—St. Julian Devine Community Center (room block at the Courtyard by Marriott Charleston Waterfront)

Albany, OR: April 12-14—Phoenix Inn Suites (room block at the Courtyard Corvallis)

Sioux Fall, SD: April 12-14—Sheraton Sioux Falls & Convention Center

Rochester, NY: May 3-5—Rochester Marriott Airport

LEADERSHIP SUMMIT ASSISTANT COACH APPLICATION

The assistant coach application is now open for the Leadership Summit which will be held April 24-28, 2019 at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO. This event is a four day educational workshop for athletes and coaches. In partnership with Forward Progress and hosted at the Colorado Springs Olympic Training Center, athletes will receive training in key leadership skills (understanding different leadership styles, finding your own leadership style, values clarification), networking and communication tools, LSC governance, safe sport, clean sport, diversity & inclusion, and servant leadership. Athlete will leave equipped to engage as leaders in their LSCs.

To apply click here.

The deadline to apply is January 5th

THE 2019 USA SWIMMING FOUNDATION GRANT APPLICATION FOR MAKE A SPLASH LOCAL PARTNERS

IS OPEN UNTIL JANUARY 15 AT 5PM EST.

In 2019, the USA Swimming Foundation will invest more than $600,000 in grants to help its Make a Splash Local Partners provide services to children who, otherwise, would not have the opportunity to participate in swim lessons. Grants will be awarded in two rounds, one in the Spring of 2019, and one in the Fall. We invite all eligible and interested USA Swimming Foundation Make a Splash Local Partners to submit proposals.

Click here to download the 2019 Grant Guidelines and Instructions  

Additional info click here. 

MANAGER’S TRIP LIST APPLICATION 

How about being involved with one of USA Swimming’s trips or camps! The application for the 2019 National Team & Sport Development Camp/Trip Manager positions is now open thru Jan. 4th: 

Apply Here

CLEAN SPORT

The information below should be shared with your athletes and their parents. Please distribute it via email, a club newsletter, or link to the articles on your team webpage.

Resources:

Our 2019 Athlete Handbook, Pocket Guide, and Wallet Card are now available! Give them a look and #competeclean in the new year! #cleansport

Supplements:

Supplement FAQ: Are herbal supplements safe? 

TEAMWORK: HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF THE COACH-PARENT DYNAMIC

BY TRUESPORT, DECEMBER 2018

To many youth sport parents, practices don’t look or sound like they did 20 years ago. There’s less screaming, kids aren’t running wind sprints after making mistakes, and parents are expected to take a more active role. Some see this shift as a sign coaches have become too soft and kids too coddled, but research does show that kids learn more and perform better when coaches, parents, and athletes work together harmoniously.

Frank Smoll, PhD, a sport psychologist at the University of Washington, says, “There’s more awareness now, compared to 20 years ago. Parents are a big part of the equation. Parents and coaches each have responsibilities to one another.”

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5 SPORTS LESSONS A FORMER PRO ATHLETE USES TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS

BY ABIGAIL HESS, CNBC.COM, AUGUST 24, 2017

A surprising number of CEOs played sports when they were younger. Former Whole Foods CEO Walter Robb was the captain of the Stanford Soccer Team. Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman played varsity squash and lacrosse at Princeton. Even Mark Zuckerberg was a high school fencing star. One Ernst & Young survey found that 96 percent of women in C-suite roles played sports…

Here are 5 lessons he learned from sports that helped him succeed in business: 

Learn More

THE HEALING POWER OF PURSUING A DREAM

FROM THE ASUNOW.COM, NOVEMBER 15, 2018

When Billy Mills beat the pack on a muddy cinder track in the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, it was one of the greatest upsets in sports history.

The grainy black-and-white video shows his graceful, effortless stride in the 10,000-meter race. But those steps were part of a difficult journey that left Mills, an Oglala Lakota, so despondent that he almost killed himself before he won the gold medal.

“That moment was magical to me. I felt as if I had wings on my feet,” Mills told a crowd at Arizona State University on Thursday night. He spoke at an event titled “Indigenous Identity and the Athletic Experience with Billy Mills,” sponsored by the Alliance of Indigenous Peoples, the Global Sport Institute and the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy. The talk was held at the Tempe campus, which is on the homeland of the Akimel O’odham and Pee-Posh peoples.

Mills was raised on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. When he was 8, his mother died, and his father told him, “It takes a dream to heal broken souls. The pursuit of a dream will heal you.”

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VINTAGE SECRETS TO BEING A GOOD CONVERSATIONALIST

BY BRETT & KATE MCKAY, ARTOFMANLINESS.COM, DECEMBER 20, 2018

The character of a person is revealed by his conversation as much as by any one quality he possesses, for strive as he may he cannot always be acting.

Importance of Conversing Well

To be able to converse well is an attainment which should be cultivated by every intelligent man and woman. It is better to be a good talker than a good singer or musician, because the former is more widely appreciated, and the company of a person who is able to talk well on a great variety of subjects, is much sought after. The importance, therefore, of cultivating the art of conversation, cannot easily be overestimated. It should be the aim of all intelligent persons to acquire the habit of talking sensibly and with facility upon all topics of general interest to society, so that they may both interest others and be themselves interested, in whatever company they may chance to be thrown.

Training Children

The training for this should be commenced in early childhood.

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THE PLATEAUING PROGRAM

BY JEFF JANSSEN, COACHAD.COM, DECEMBER 2018 

Understanding why some programs hit a wall and how they can break through it.

A plateauing program is one that attains a certain level of success but can’t seem to move beyond it.

These are the teams that win roughly half of their games each year and do just enough to keep their administrators somewhat content.

These also are the perennial NCAA bubble teams that are always hoping to make the tournament but somehow end up on the outside looking in. Or maybe they make the tournament but can’t make it very far.

Plateauing programs just never seem to get over the hump. Programs can level off at various points for a variety of subtle and not so subtle reasons. In the end, plateauing programs usually end up defeating themselves from within because of limiting mindsets and practices that have taken hold within the program.

Let’s take a look at eight limiting factors that can put a powerful lid on a plateauing program and limit its potential.

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