ADMAthleteDevelopmentModelLogos_WHT

COMPETENCE

CHARACTER

CONFIDENCE

CONNECTION

ALL VALUES

THE KNOWLEDGE, SKILL & STRENGTH TO BE EFFICIENT AND SUCCESSFUL
DEVELOPING INDIVIDUAL MENTAL & MORAL STRENGTH
ABILITY TO ACHIEVE RESULTS IN SKILL
WORKING WITH COACH & TEAM TO BUILD RELATIONSHIPS
COMPETENCE • CHARACTER • CONFIDENCE • CONNECTION
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  • Level 1
  • Level 2
  • Level 3
  • Level 4
  • Level 5
  • Level 6
ADMAthleteDevelopmentModelLogos_FULL

Coaches can reference USA Swimming’s Athlete Development Model as a tool to create your team’s long-term athlete development plan, design the practice group structure, and evaluate the overall development and progress of your swimmers.

 

In the USA Swimming ADM, there are six levels of development focusing on the four critical athlete-centered outcomes with the USOPC’s Quality Coaching Framework:

Competence

Sport specific skills, improved health & fitness, healthy training habits


Character

Respect for the sport, ethical and moral responsible behavior, integrity and empathy


Confidence

Self- belief, resilience, mental toughness, positive self- worth


Connection

Positive bonds and social relationships in and out of the sport


 

Coaches support each athlete’s journey progressing through the four C’s, and the ADM provides suggested training guidelines and competitive performance metrics. Once an athlete progresses beyond level 6 of the ADM, they should be capable of competing at the USA Swimming Speedo Sectional swim meet and above.

 

Quality coaches acknowledge and embrace the principles and core values of the ADM. 

GOALS OF ADM
  • Give athletes, coaches, and parents a positive experience in the sport of swimming.
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  • Keep athletes, coaches, and parents engaged in the sport longer.
  •  

  • Help increase the “pool” that our National Team athletes come from.
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  • Teach athletes life skills that will help them be successful in life. 

 

 

Principles & Core Values of the ADM

Athletes

Keep the athlete at the center. Are they having fun?

EXCELLENCE
Educate coaches, parents, and athletes to see the big picture. Excellence takes time. 
LIFE SKILLS
There is more to coaching than just reading a time or giving a set. Teaching them life skills that they will take into their everyday lives. 
"SPORT SAMPLING"
Encourage them to participate in other sports and become well-rounded athletes. Kids are less active now with schools taking away PE class and recess.
QUALITY COACHING/TRAINED COACHES
Educating coaches on age and developmentally appropriate skills. Help promote great technique and prevent injuries. Being engaged in the workout and learning new/ different ways to communicate to athletes and parents.

The ADM is not meant to create clone coaching. The “how” of getting to each milestone is completely up to the coach and athletes.

 

Athlete development and accomplishments result from balancing the art and science of coaching. Physical, mental, and emotional development occurs in spurts. Not every athlete will progress at the same pace or even make it to level 6.

 

Each swimmer’s journey proceeds at an individual pace, with many different levels of success. As quality coaches, the ADM helps you address the full development of each swimmer. Your role as a quality coach is to use these ADM progressions to create an athlete’s career plan addressing all areas of development.

ADM-Connection-hero-1400x700
Competence Level 1
PHYSICAL


ONE
From a push maintain a prone streamlined body position, defined as one hand on top of the other, ears between the upper arms, lower body stretched long, and toes pointed.

a. Hold this position for at least one and one-half body lengths, and be able to vary the depth of the underwater push-off.

b. Introduce underwater kicking skills.

  Turns- PASA Pushoffs
  Turns- Pencil Push Kick Swim
  Turns- Kicking through your turns
TWO
Execute a breakout from a push by holding the streamlined position; then initiate a kicking action and progress to the surface of the water with a pull to the surface.
THREE
Vertical sculling- help learn for the feel of the water. Maintain a vertical, stationary position with little or no leg movement in deep water, using a sculling motion.
FOUR
Complete legal freestyle and backstroke technique for one length of the pool using shoulder and hip technique.

FREESTYLE

a. Demonstrate the ability to comfortably take a breath on either the right or left side.

b. Execute a legal freestyle flip turn

  Timing the breath
  One eye breathing
  Early vertical forearm
  One Arm- both (#1)
  One Arm- both (#2)
  6 count switch
  Head games- Aquajets


BACKSTROKE

a. Demonstrate shoulder and hip roll motion with head back for 25 yards
b. For additional backstroke drills see…

  Teach Backstroke Timing
  Teach Backstroke Breathing
  Single Arm Backstroke Alternating Arms
  Continuous Single Arm Position 11 Back
  Half Recovery Backstroke
FIVE
Stroke progressions.
Begin to develop the butterfly and breaststroke kick.
Complete the Racing Start Progression.
SIX
Perform an open turn, either prone or supine, where the hand touches the wall first, the body rotates to place the feet against the wall, the body drops underwater, and the athlete pushes off in a streamlined position.

  Turns- Hot Hand Open Turn
SEVEN
Aerobic endurance:

a. Can complete a 30-minute practice session.

b. Can complete a continuous swim and kick for five minutes. (200 meters/ yards of free)
DRYLAND


ONE
Develop motor skills through play.
TWO
Skills taught in Isolation prior to dynamic environment.
THREE
Generic Skills that cut across multiple sports.
FOUR
Participate in multiple sports.
COGNITIVE


ONE
From a push the athlete counts the number of strokes/ cycles per length for freestyle and backstroke.
TWO
Athlete should be able to repeat key words as prescribed by the coach to explain/describe movements appropriate to that level.
THREE
Begins to use the pace clock.
a. Leaving :05 or :10 a part in the lane
b. Intervals using :00 & :30 (“top” & “bottom”).
NUTRITION


ONE
Understands the concept of Food as Fuel, and the importance of proper nutrition to delivery nutrients and energy.
TWO
Macronutrients as Fuel: Carbs/Proteins/Fats.
THREE
Introduce Micronutrients: Vitamins, Minerals, Water.
Competence Level 2
PHYSICAL


ONE
Execute a start from the blocks. Hold the underwater streamlined position for one and one-half body lengths, initiate a kicking action for one body length, and progress to the surface of the water with a pull.

  Start (backstroke wedge start)
TWO
Execute a legal backstroke, butterfly, and breaststroke turn, including an approach of at least 10 yards/meters.

  Butterfly & breaststroke turns
  Butterfly & breaststroke turns
THREE
Performs a legal breaststroke pullout with a dolphin kick.
FOUR
Stroke progression- Complete progressions for the butterfly and breaststroke

BUTTERFLY

a. Demonstrate an undulating motion during the butterfly stroke.
b. Demonstrate correct timing of the pull, kick, and breath during the butterfly.
c. Complete one length of the pool with legal butterfly form.

  Butterfly kick on stomach
  Butterfly- Teaching a better catch (all steps) #1
  Butterfly- Teaching a better catch (all steps) #2
  Single-Arm Butterfly straight arm
  Single-Arm Butterfly straight arm
  3 left- 3 right- 3 whole- stroke butterfly
  Butterfly- Teaching a better catch (all steps) #3
  Butterfly- Teaching a better catch (all steps) #4
  Butterfly- Teaching a better catch (all steps) #5
  Butterfly- Teaching a better catch (all steps) #6


BREASTSTROKE

a. Complete one length of the pool with legal breaststroke form.
b. Demonstrate correct timing of the pull, kick, and breath during the breaststroke.

  Underwater pullout hand recovery
  Breaststroke- head position
  Breaststroke- silent
  Breaststroke- annotated
FIVE
Performs 100 yards or 100 meters of individual medley with legal technique and turns.
SIX
Perform relay exchanges.
SEVEN
Performs prescribed underwater dolphin kicks for freestyle, backstroke and butterfly on starts and turns;and breaststroke on pullouts.

  Adding Dolphins
  Practice Underwater Dolphins
  Start Underwater Dolphins
EIGHT
Breathes within the rhythm of stroke in all four strokes.
NINE
AEROBIC ENDURANCE

Can complete continuous swim and kick for 10 minutes.
TEN
AEROBIC ENDURANCE

Can complete continuous swim and kick for 10 minutes.
DRYLAND


ONE
Introduction to games and activities that include kicking, throwing, catching, striking, tossing, hopping, jumping, and skipping.
TWO
Skills are introduced daily or for one week and then changed up. (IE., Hops are from right leg to right leg jumps, the next week bounds right leg hop to left leg land).
THREE
Participate in multiple sports.
COGNITIVE


ONE
From a push the athlete counts the number of strokes/cycles per length for each stroke.
TWO
The athlete begins to understand maturation, physical development, and nutrition.
a. Understands and accepts individual differences in physical size within an age group.
b. Understands that energy for exercise is derived from nutrition.
THREE
Accurately counts and computes distances.
Continues progress with using the pace clock
Intervals using :00, :20, :40.
NUTRITION


ONE
Understands the importance of knowing and demonstrating basic food preparation and cooking skills.
TWO
Plan and pack foods appropriate for pre/post workouts.
Competence Level 3
PHYSICAL


ONE
Perform a legal 100 of each stroke, a 200 individual medley and the age appropriate distance event.
TWO
Increase number of underwater dolphin kicks with increased speed and efficiency for freestyle, backstroke and butterfly.

  Kick Set Flip Turns
  Turns- Delayed Dolphins
THREE
Breathes within the rhythm of stroke under race conditions in all four strokes.
FOUR
Perform effective finishes.
FIVE
Perform correct timing for relay exchange.
SIX
Breathes within the rhythm of stroke under race conditions in all four strokes
SEVEN
Short sprints of all strokes at maximum velocity working on racing skills, coordination, starts and finishes.
EIGHT
AEROBIC ENDURANCE

Performs threshold set one time per season (T-20, 10X200, etc.)
DRYLAND


ONE
The athlete starts to learn athletic movements on land that they aren’t getting playing other sports.
TWO
Template:
a. Flexibility routine
b. Athletic development (linear/lateral movements)
c. Gymnastic strength activities
d. Kicking, throwing, tossing, hopping, jumping and skipping activities and games
THREE
The athlete participates in multiple sports/activities.
COGNITIVE


ONE
Complete one length of all four strokes holding the same time or faster but using fewer strokes/cycles than in level 2.
TWO
Swims with prescribed technique during practice and meets.
THREE
Swims with prescribed breathing patterns during practice and meets.
FOUR
Athlete understands maturation and physical development: begins to understand relationship between training programs, maturation, and physical development.
FIVE
Athlete understands the purpose of heart rate measurement.
SIX
The athlete can measure his or her own resting and exercise heart rate.
SEVEN
The athlete understands the importance of muscular flexibility in swimming performance.
EIGHT
Introduction of broken swims to learn race strategy and pacing.
NINE
Athlete begins to see the correlation between practice times and competition times.
TEN
Continues progress with using the pace clock.
Intervals of any kind
NUTRITION


ONE
Learns and understands how to shop and eat healthy on a budget.
TWO
Understand Nutrient Density and its impact on food choices.
Competence Level 4
PHYSICAL


ONE
Complete one length of each stroke holding the same time or faster but using fewer strokes/cycles than in level 3.
TWO
Maintain consistent stroke rates and times in training sets.

  All- Strokes- Stroke Count
THREE
Performs the 200’s of stroke and a 400 individual medley.
FOUR
Kicks to 10 meters using underwater dolphin kicks faster than in previous level.

  Underwater Dolphins
  Fast Dolphins
FIVE
Improve speed, power and distance to 15 meters in each stroke.
SIX
Performs a relay exchange with advanced technique.
SEVEN
AEROBIC ENDURANCE

Performs threshold set one time per season (T-30, 10X300, etc.)
DRYLAND


ONE
The athlete starts to take ownership of the dryland activities.
TWO
The athlete continues the work from Level III with an emphasis on keeping the body healthy and injury free.
THREE
The athlete participates in dryland approximately three times per week.
COGNITIVE


ONE
The athlete begins to understand the basics of different energy system usage in sprinting versus distance swimming.
TWO
The athlete understands the relationship between distance per stroke, stroke rate, and swimming speed.
THREE
The athlete can name two ways to minimize resistance or drag from the water.
FOUR
The athlete can explain an efficient stroke pattern in relation to creating propulsion.
FIVE
The athlete understands the concept of a balanced diet and basic fuels used.
SIX
The athlete can use heart rate measurement to monitor exercise intensity and recovery.
SEVEN
Athlete begins to train at known race paces.
EIGHT
Athlete follows prescribed race plan.
NUTRITION


ONE
Understands how to navigate through a grocery store.
TWO
Understands how to build a healthy plate.
THREE
Plan and pack for multi-event swim meet -fueling/recovery snacks.
Competence Level 5
PHYSICAL


ONE
Ability to change speed while maintaining stroke efficiency.
TWO
Performs more effective underwater swimming off start and turn in all strokes than in previous Level.
THREE
Maintains proper technique under increased training loads.
FOUR
AEROBIC ENDURANCE

Performs a threshold set two times per season with continuous improvement.
DRYLAND


ONE
The athlete is introduced to foam rolling & dynamic warm-up.
TWO
The athlete starts a strength routine which includes:
a. Variety of exercises rotated every 5-7 weeks.
b. 15-20 reps to strengthen muscle tendon junction.
c. 15-20 reps for movement mastery.
d. Low load.
THREE
The athlete is introduced to light jump training:
a. Emphasize landing mechanics first.
b. Double leg, single leg, reactionary.
FOUR
The athlete works on aquatic posture on land:
a. Endurance & strength from finger tips to toes.
b. Balance muscles not primarily used in swimming.
c. Introduce prehab & corrective exercises.
FIVE
The athlete participates in dryland 3-5 times per week.
COGNITIVE


ONE
The athlete understands the difference between aerobic and anaerobic energy systems.
TWO
The athlete, with the assistance of his or her coach, can calculate swimming speed, distance per stroke, and stroke rate during competition and training.
THREE
Can manipulate stroke rate and distance per stroke to vary speed.
FOUR
The athlete understands nutritional requirements and timing for training and competition: demonstrates understanding of basic nutrition principles, fuels for swimming performance, training diets, hydration, RDAs for athletes, and the importance of eating a balanced diet.
FIVE
The athlete understands the relationship between training, maturation and development and their effects on competitive performance.
SIX
The athlete understands how to use heart rate measurement to monitor training.
SEVEN
Athlete knows race plans for each event (including prelims and finals) and appropriate training paces to achieve goal time(s).
NUTRITION


ONE
Understand nutrition periodization and how to fuel depending on variations in training days and weeks.
Competence Level 6
PHYSICAL


ONE
Continue to decrease the number of stroke cycles, or swim faster with the same number of cycles.
TWO
Decrease the number of cycles per length during competition.
THREE
Lactate tolerance: performs a set of 12 x 100 (or until failure) on 2:30 holding current best 200 pace (2nd 100 split) three times per season with continuous improvement.
FOUR
Sprint capacity/CP system: performs 12 x 25 on 3:00 (specialty stroke) at maximum velocity.
FIVE
AEROBIC ENDURANCE

Performs a threshold set three times per season with continuous improvement.
DRYLAND


ONE
The dryland program follows the swim program through structured rotation of the exercises that have purpose and intent.
TWO
The athlete continues with an athletic based strength program:
a. The intensity and volume is monitored with daily and weekly prioritization
b. The athlete’s dryland program is optimized physically, emotionally and socially for the training group.
c. A wide variety & catalog of exercises is used to accommodate all needs (injury prevention and different body types).
THREE
The athlete will do a plyometric program which will emphasize landing properly and jumping as quickly and as high as possible.
FOUR
The athlete continues to work on different body parts that go into good aquatic posture.
FIVE
The athlete participates in dryland 4-5 times per week with optimal of 3x/week strength and 2x/week general athleticism (approximate time of 40-60 minutes each session).
COGNITIVE


ONE
The athlete can calculate swimming speed, distance per stroke, and stroke rate.
TWO
Stroke Control/speed control.
THREE
Swim faster by increasing DPS while maintaining SR.
FOUR
Swim faster by increasing SR while maintaining DPS.
FIVE
Choose precise DPS/SR combinations for different races.
SIX
The athlete demonstrates knowledge of energy systems.
a. Can describe the relationship between training sets and energy systems.
b. Demonstrates an understanding of training periodization.
NUTRITION


ONE
Understand and execute recovery nutrition snacks and meals after hard training and competition.
Character Level 1
CHAMPIONSHIP BEHAVIOR AND ACCOUNTABILITY


ONE
The athlete understands that he or she is part of a team and has respect for his or her teammates.
TWO
The athlete listens to recommendations from the coach and tries to make the appropriate changes.
THREE
The athlete understands appropriate team rules and the consequences of breaking the rules.
WORK ETHIC AND SELF-DISCIPLINE


ONE
The athlete will pick up and put away any equipment he or she used in practice.
two
The athlete will be ready to start practice on time with the appropriate equipment (suits, goggles, etc.).
Three
The athlete gives the coach his or her undivided attention while the coach is talking. The athlete should focus his or her eyes on the coach and remain quiet when the coach is talking. The athlete will also follow directions set forth by the coach in practice.
FOUR
The athlete will “Just say no!” to drugs and other harmful substances.
FIVE
The athlete will show respect for the facilities and equipment.
SIX
The athlete will swim the entire set (e.g., doesn’t walk on bottom, counts accurately).
Character Level 2
CHAMPIONSHIP BEHAVIOR AND ACCOUNTABILITY


ONE
The athlete demonstrates an understanding of sportsmanship–championship behavior (e.g., doesn’t throw goggles, congratulates opponents).
TWO
The athlete will treat teammates, parents, and coaches like he or she would want to be treated.
THREE
The athlete talks to the coach immediately before and after each race.
FOUR
The athlete knows basic meet procedures including how to use and read a heat sheet.
FIVE
The athlete learns basic race tactics.
WORK ETHIC AND SELF-DISCIPLINE


ONE
During practice the athlete will:
a. leave on time during sets,
b. start and finish at the wall,
c. swim the set in the prescribed manner (e.g., doesn’t do freestyle on butterfly sets, doesn’t pull on kicking sets, performs all turns legally), and
d. swim the entire set (e.g., doesn’t walk on bottom, counts accurately).
two
The athlete will communicate with his or her coach.
TIME MANAGEMENT


ONE
The athlete understands the importance of hard work in the classroom and will complete his or her homework on time.
Character Level 3
CHAMPIONSHIP BEHAVIOR AND ACCOUNTABILITY


ONE
The athlete demonstrates a higher level of sportsmanship–championship behavior than in level 2 (e.g., respects competitors and gets along with friends regardless of ability level).
TWO
Athlete knows qualifiying standards for highest level competitions.
WORK ETHIC AND SELF-DISCIPLINE


ONE
The athlete attends the recommended meets and understands the importance of being on time for meet warm-ups.
two
The athlete meets the established attendance requirements.
three
The athlete challenges him- or herself to perform to the utmost of his or her ability in practice.
TIME MANAGEMENT


ONE
The athlete demonstrates an ability to balance school and outside activities.
Character Level 4
CHAMPIONSHIP BEHAVIOR AND ACCOUNTABILITY


ONE
The athlete has knowledge of required times to qualify for finals.
WORK ETHIC AND SELF-DISCIPLINE


ONE
The athlete is not influenced by the negative behavior of his or her teammates.
two
The athlete understands and takes responsibility for attendance, performance, and habits in practice and how these three relate to meet performance.
three
Athlete understands the traits of a positive leader and endeavors to become one.
Character Level 5
CHAMPIONSHIP BEHAVIOR AND ACCOUNTABILITY


ONE
The athlete accepts the responsibility of being a leader and/or role model. The athlete will lead by being a positive example.
WORK ETHIC AND SELF-DISCIPLINE


ONE
The athlete will demonstrate an understanding of the short- and long-term effects of performance-enhancing drugs.
TIME MANAGEMENT


ONE
The athlete uses time management skills to prioritize activities.
Character Level 6
CHAMPIONSHIP BEHAVIOR AND ACCOUNTABILITY


ONE
The athlete demonstrates leadership responsibilities by working with younger athletes.
TIME MANAGEMENT


ONE
The athlete has mastered time management skills so outside activities do not interfere with practice and meet attendance
Confidence Level 1
ONE
The athlete demonstrates “industry”, or a sense of becoming capable of performing increasingly complex tasks outlined in the other three dimensions (coachable)
TWO
The athlete understands and behaviorally demonstrates that others can teach them new things (willing to learn new things and new perspectives-coachable)
THREE
The athlete behaviorally demonstrates and verbally communicates that participation in this activity is worth their time and effort (fun).
FOUR
The athlete behaviorally demonstrates “initiative and competency” – becomes more comfortable with the pool/swimming environment and culture.
FIVE
The athlete behaviorally demonstrates both a “me and a we” (egocentrism) in their learning and participation.
Confidence Level 2
PEAK PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT


ONE
Understands and can demonstrate the difference between tense and relaxed muscles.
TWO
Can identify past situations where both, tense and relaxed muscles, have been present.
THREE
Can describe the relationship between nervousness and performance.
FOUR
Can describe the mind–body connection (negative thoughts lead to tight muscles lead to poor performance).
SELF-IMAGE


ONE
Understands the role of failure and the importance of learning from one’s mistakes; understands that this is essential to becoming a champion.


SELF-TALK


ONE
Has a general understanding of the effect that negative self-talk plays on performance (understands the concept of GIGO—garbage in, garbage out).


MENTAL TRAINING


ONE
Understands that an important part of training in swimming involves the mental dimension.
CONCENTRATION


ONE
Possesses a basic understanding of the concept of concentration.
TWO
Knows the difference between focusing on what’s important and what’s not.
THREE
Has an understanding of what to focus on and what to block out both in practice and in meets.
FOUR
Is aware when focus leaves target and knows how to bring focus back (how to concentrate).
Confidence Level 3
PEAK PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT


ONE
Understands the relationship between relaxation and performance.
TWO
Knows the three levels of nervousness (too little, just right, too much).
THREE
Can perform diaphragmatic (belly) breathing as relaxation technique.
FOUR
Understands that stress comes from negative self-talk and faulty focus of concentration.
FIVE
Understands the concept of “UC’s,” or uncontrollables, as a major source of stress.
SELF-IMAGE


ONE
Is able to accept criticism from the coach.
TWO
Understands that criticism is a critique of skills not a critique of an individual.


SELF TALK


ONE
Understands the benefits of and uses positive self-talk and affirmations.
TWO
Closely monitors negative self-talk.
CONCENTRATION


ONE
Understands the importance of concentration in practice and meets and can regularly recognize a faulty focus and bring self back to a proper focus.


GOAL SETTING


ONE
Understands the value of setting process and outcome goals for both practice and meets.
TWO
Athlete knows best times for practice and meets.
THREE
Athlete sets and writes process and outcome goals.
Confidence Level 4
PEAK PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT


ONE
Can combine self-talk and slow breathing for peak performance management.
TWO
Has a clear awareness of personal stressors (UCs).
THREE
Is capable of performing progressive muscle relaxation.
FOUR
Recognizes that anxiety can negatively affect mind and body.
FIVE
Knows techniques to control mind (positive self-talk and imagery) and body (deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation).
SELF-TALK


ONE
Knows at least one technique for handling negative self-talk.


IMAGERY AND VISUALIZATION


ONE
Understands the importance of imagery in enhancing performance.
TWO
Knows the principles behind effective imagery practice.
THREE
Can perform basic visualization skills.
CONCENTRATION


ONE
Can quickly return concentration focus in practice and in meets from uncontrollables to appropriate focus.


GOAL SETTING


ONE
Athlete regularly visits, and if need be, re-evaluates goals.
Confidence Level 5
PEAK PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT


ONE
Demonstrates an understanding of the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) concept.
TWO
Can identify their own optimal zone of performance both in practice and competition.
THREE
Understands personal signs of under- or over excitement (“not enough” or “too much”).
FOUR
Skilled in two or more techniques to control excitement/nervousness.
SELF-IMAGE


ONE
Realizes that positive comments help reduce stress, build confidence, and can increase the enjoyment of competition and practice.
TWO
Understands the damage of negative self-talk to self-esteem, performance, and the enjoyment of the sport.


IMAGERY AND VISUALIZATION


ONE
Can visualize a race from start to finish. Can control the image so vision matches actual performance.
CONCENTRATION


ONE
Develops a pre-race ritual or routine.
TWO
Develops race focal points for concentration.


GOAL SETTING


ONE
Has developed a long-range goal within the sport.
TWO
Develops short-term and intermediate goals that ultimately tie into long-range goals.
MEET AND PRACTICE BEHAVIOR


ONE
Understands the effect of posture and actions on emotions.
TWO
Uses the “Act as if” strategy as a fallback position.
Confidence Level 6
PEAK PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT


ONE
Demonstrates an understanding of factors that excite and relax the athlete.
TWO
Utilizes relaxation techniques under meet duress to perform optimally.
THREE
Maintains optimum relaxation level (“good nervousness”), regardless of uncontrollables.
FOUR
Learns to utilize imagery skills to manage competitive stress.
SELF-IMAGE AND GOAL SETTING


ONE
Can use ultimate goal in sport to maintain intensity and work ethic in practice.


SELF TALK


ONE
Able to positively reframe uncontrollables and adversity to enhance confidence.
IMAGERY AND VISUALIZATION


ONE
Through instruction is able to visualize a race from start to finish in complete detail (seeing, hearing, and feeling).


CONCENTRATION


ONE
Demonstrates and ability to rebound quickly from mistakes and failures.
TWO
Able to successfully use pre-race routines and control focal points to maintain concentration during a race.
THREE
Consistently swims “in own lane” in practice and meets.
Connection Level 1
COMMITMENT AND TEAM LOYALTY


ONE
The athlete will know the team name and team colors.
TWO
The athlete will know the names of teammates and coaches in his or her practice group on the team.
THREE
The athlete will know the name of the training group immediately above.
Connection Level 2
COMMITMENT AND TEAM LOYALTY


ONE
The athlete will learn the history of the team.
TWO
The athlete takes pride in being a member of the team, which the athlete demonstrates by
a. participating in team cheers,
b. knowing the coaches’ names, and
c. cheering on teammates during swims (practice or meets)
d. wearing team uniform/outfitting.
THREE
The athlete will know the name of any other training group(s) on the team besides his or her own group (example: “age group 1,” “age group 2,” “senior” and “national”).
Connection Level 3
COMMITMENT AND TEAM LOYALTY


ONE
The athlete chooses a national swimming hero and knows the event in which he or she competed or competes.
Connection Level 4
COMMITMENT AND TEAM LOYALTY


ONE
We are currently working on this section. Please check back later!
Connection Level 5
COMMITMENT AND TEAM LOYALTY


ONE
The athlete understands the difference between self-interest and team goals.
TWO
The athlete demonstrates commitment to his or her team by continued dedicated membership.
THREE
Choose to be an athlete.
Connection Level 6
COMMITMENT AND TEAM LOYALTY


ONE
The athlete shows loyalty to team by working with younger athletes and helping them understand what the sport of swimming can offer them as people.

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